Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 04:39

resist

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman resistre, Middle French resister, and their source, Latin resistere, from re- + sistere (cause to stand).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

resist (third-person singular simple present resists, present participle resisting, simple past and past participle resisted)

  1. (transitive) To attempt to counter the actions or effects of.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21: 
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic who still resists the idea that something drastic needs to happen for him to turn his life around.
  2. (transitive) To withstand the actions of.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
  3. (intransitive) To oppose.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To be distasteful to.

Usage notesEdit

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TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

resist (plural resists)

  1. A protective coating or covering. [1]

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.