rooted

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

rooted (comparative more rooted, superlative most rooted)

  1. Fixed in one position; immobile; unable to move.
    She stayed rooted in place.
    • 2002, Peter Loizos, Chapter Two: Misconceiving refugees?, Renos K. Papadopoulos (editor), Therapeutic Care for Refugees: No Place Like Home, page 54,
      Those with fewest attachments or obligations may be most vulnerable to transitions from a more rooted life, before flight, to the new as-yet unrooted or uprooted life.
    • 2011 October 15, Michael Da Silva, “Wigan 1 - 3 Bolton”, BBC Sport:
      Six successive defeats had left them rooted to the bottom of the Premier League table but, clearly under instructions to attack from the outset, Bolton started far the brighter.
  2. (figuratively) Ingrained, as through repeated use; entrenched; habitual or instinctive.
    • 1782 May, Isaac Kimber, Edward Kimber (editors), The Link-Boy, The London Magazine, or, Gentleman′s Monthly Intelligencer, Volume 51, page 205,
      He will immediately break in on their moſt rooted prejudices ; and with a kind of malignant ſatisfaction hack their darling notions with unſparing rigour and unbluſhing inſolence.
    • 1985, Anthony Hyman, Charles Babbage: Pioneer Of The Computer, page 32,
      The greater part of his property he has acquired himself during years of industry ; but with it he has acquired the most rooted habits of suspicion.
    • 2011, William P. Ryan, Working from the Heart: A Therapist′s Guide to Heart-Centered Psychotherapy, page 47,
      With other experiences added on top, the feeling state becomes more entrenched, more rooted.
  3. (figuratively, usually with "in") Having a basic or fundamental connection (to a thing); based, originating (from).
    • 1979, Edward Digby Baltzell, Puritan Boston and Quaker Philadelphia, page 280,
      Proper Philadelphians, especially before they became Episcopalians, and the unfashionable branches of their families to this day are surely more rooted in Westtown than St. Paul′s, the fashionable favorite.
    • 1997, William E. Reiser, To Hear God′s Word, Listen to the World: The Liberation of Spirituality, page 12,
      For what is gradually taking hold, I think, is a way of drawing near to God that is far more rooted in history and far more rooted in the gospel than we have been accustomed to.
    • 2008, Michael Allen Gillespie, The Theological Origins of Modernity, page 93,
      This form of humanism posed a greater danger to the monks and clerics than Italian humanism because it was less extravagant, less pagan, and more rooted in an ideal of Christian charity that the church at least nominally shared.
  4. (mathematics, graph theory, of a tree or graph) Having a root.
  5. (slang) In trouble or in strife, screwed.
    I am absolutely rooted if Ferris finds out about this
  6. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) Broken, damaged, non-functional.
    I'm going to have to call a mechanic, my car's rooted.
  7. (computing, not comparable) Having a root (superuser) account that has been compromised.
    You are rooted. All your base are belong to us.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

rooted

  1. simple past tense and past participle of root
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 23:01