EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /zɪz/ (as if "s's")

ParticleEdit

s’

  1. Plural possessive marker, indicating than an object belongs to the plural noun phrase bearing the marker.
    Chris’s heart leapt when she saw the expressions on her teachers’ faces. (the teacher + s’)

Usage notesEdit

Traditionally, the possessives of classical and Biblical names ending in s, such as Archimedes and Jesus, are written without a final “s”.
This can lead to confusion, especially in print, since in this case, s’ it is not indicating a plural noun.

Archimedes’ Principle
Jesus’ disciples

For current usage, the above rule (for example, with regard to the Spanish given name Jesus) does not need to be applied as it is not occurring in a Biblical or classical context.

This is Jesus Ramirez, and this is Jesus’s wife.

Please see also Usage notes for ’s for further clarification.


CatalanEdit

PronounEdit

s’

  1. Contraction of es.

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

ConjunctionEdit

s’

  1. elision of siif” before il or ils
    S’il vous plaît. - Please. or Here you are.
    Je ne sais pas s’ils viendront demain. - I don’t know if they will come tomorrow.

PronounEdit

s’ (third person)

  1. elision of se before a word beginning with a vowel.
    Il s’habille. - He’s dressing (himself).
    Il s’aime. - He loves himself.
    Ils s’aiment. - They love themselves. or They love each other.
  1. (informal) elision of se before a word beginning with a consonant.
    Y s’bouge le cul ou quoi? - Is he movin’ his ass or what?

ItalianEdit

PronounEdit

s’ (second and third person)

  1. (before a vowel) apocopic form of si

NeapolitanEdit

PronounEdit

s’

  1. (before a vowel) apocopic form of se

Old FrenchEdit

PronounEdit

s'

  1. his; her; its (elided form of son or sa before a word starting with a vowel)
Last modified on 9 February 2014, at 15:09