sanguinary

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sanguinarius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sanguinary (comparative more sanguinary, superlative most sanguinary)

  1. Attended with bloodshed.
    • Francis Bacon
      We may not propagate religion by wars, or by sanguinary persecutions to force consciences.
    • 1887, Henry Rider Haggard, Allan Quatermain, Chapter XIII,
      " [] every one of which took its rise from some noble family that succeeded in grasping the purple after a sanguinary struggle."
  2. Eager to shed blood; bloodthirsty.
    • Broome
      Passion [] makes us brutal and sanguinary.
    • 1877, Samuel Green, The Life of Mahomet: Founder of the Religion of Islamism and of the Empire of the Saracens with Notices of the History of Islamism and of Arabia, p. 126,
      "The defence set up for Mahomet is equally availing for every sanguinary and revengeful tyrant; [] "
  3. Consisting of, covered with or similar in appearance to blood.
    • 1913, H. G. Wells, Little Wars, Section VI,
      Here is the premeditation, the thrill, the strain of accumulating victory or disaster—and no smashed nor sanguinary bodies [] , that we who are old enough to remember a real modern war know to be the reality of belligerence.

Usage notesEdit

  • Not to be confused with sanguine. Sanguine means “optimistic”, while sanguinary means “bloodthirsty, gory”.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

sanguinary (plural sanguinaries)

  1. A bloodthirsty person.
  2. The plant yarrow, or herba sanguinaria.
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 11:52