Last modified on 12 May 2014, at 21:23

sapere aude

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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

It is from the epithet of a parable, explaining that a fool waits for the stream to stop before crossing, while a wise man forgoes comfort and crosses anyway.

The original use seems to be in Epistle II of Horace's Epistularum liber primus[1]: Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude ("He who has begun is half done: dare to know!").

PhraseEdit

sapere aude

  1. "Have the courage to think for yourself"
  2. "Have courage to use your own reason", in the context of committing to tasks that need to be embarked upon, however unpleasant or awkward.

Usage notesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Epistularum liber primus from The Latin Library, line 40