sapient

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sapient, or its source, Latin sapiēns.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sapient (comparative more sapient, superlative most sapient)

  1. (now literary or ironic) Possessing wisdom and discernment; wise, learned.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 217:
      In Europe I had been told by sapient academics that there wasn't really any class system in the United States: well, you couldn't prove that by the conditions in California's agribusinesses, or indeed its urban factories.

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LatinEdit

VerbEdit

sapient

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of sapiō

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin sapiēns. Compare savant

AdjectiveEdit

sapient m

  1. wise; sapient

DeclensionEdit

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RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sapiēns, sapientis.

AdjectiveEdit

sapient

  1. (rare) learned, wise

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Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 19:40