Last modified on 10 November 2014, at 23:40
See also: sciò

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scio (uncountable, accusative scion)

  1. knowledge

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

scio

  1. first-person singular present indicative of sciare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *skey- (to split, to dissect). Compare Ancient Greek σχίζω (skhízō), Latin scindō, Avestan [script needed] (fra-sānəm), English science, Proto-Germanic *skajjǭ.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active sciō, present infinitive scīre, perfect active scīvī, supine scītum

  1. I can, know, understand, have knowledge.
    Scisne ubi habitemus?
    Do you know where we live?
  2. I know carnally.

InflectionEdit

  • The third and fourth principal parts are shared with scīscō.
  • Irregular forms are commonly encountered in early Latin, especially in the imperfect and future tenses.
  • The regular present imperatives, scī and scīte, are almost never encountered, with the regular second person future imperative forms scīto and scītōte being used instead.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • scio in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879