Last modified on 18 June 2013, at 23:04

scrub in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

scrub in (third-person singular simple present scrubs in, present participle scrubbing in, simple past and past participle scrubbed in)

  1. (healthcare) To thoroughly wash one's hands and forearms in preparation for performing a surgery.
    • 2007 September 11, Mary Lou Parks, "O Lord Have Mercy!": Finding Our Way As Student Nurses in the 1950s, Dog Ear Publishing, ISBN 9781598584110, OL 12496965M, page 83:
      There were no booties to wear over their shoes, and they wore scrub caps on their heads only if they were going to scrub in for a procedure. When you scrubbed in for surgery you couldn't touch anything after you finished scrubbing.
    • 2008 August 18, Lee G. Bolman; Terrence E. Deal, Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice and Leadership, edition Fourth Edition, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, ISBN 9780787987992, OL 16886877M, page 99:
      Members of the transplant team scrub in and go about their respective duties.
    • 2009 August 26, Thomas F. Sellers, Jr., What's Up, Doc?: A Lifetime in Medicine: 1946-1990, Bloomington: iUniverse, ISBN 9781440163326, OL 25417401M, page 43:
      When we were assigned to a surgical patient, we were expected to “scrub in” on his or her patients’ surgery when it occurred. [] To “scrub in” on a case meant one was to be part of the operating team, which might consist of one or two advanced residents and a second year resident or intern or two.