sectator

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sectātor, from sectārī, frequentative of sequī (to follow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sectator (plural sectators)

  1. (now rare) A follower, a disciple; someone who follows a particular school; partisan.
    • 1662, Thomas Salusbury, Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, II:
      But that the Earth, Water, Air, are of a nature equally constituted immoveable about the centre, is it not the opinion of your self, Aristotle, Ptolomy, and all their sectators?

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

sectātor m (genitive sectātōris); third declension

  1. follower, attendant, adherent

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sectātor sectātōrēs
genitive sectātōris sectātōrum
dative sectātōrī sectātōribus
accusative sectātōrem sectātōrēs
ablative sectātōre sectātōribus
vocative sectātor sectātōrēs

VerbEdit

sectātor

  1. second-person singular future active imperative of sector
  2. third-person singular future active imperative of sector
Last modified on 19 March 2014, at 07:48