Last modified on 18 June 2013, at 23:39

see you next Tuesday

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from the fact that "see" and "you" are homophones for "c" and "u", while the first letters of "next" and "Tuesday" are "n" and "t".

NounEdit

see you next Tuesday

  1. (idiomatic, euphemistic): A euphemism for cunt.
    • 1980, David Guy Compton, The Unsleeping Eye‎, p. 130:
      See you next Tuesday — it's a dirty insult. The initials make a dirty insult.
    • 1997, Philip Thody, Don't Do It!: A Dictionary of the Forbidden, p. 143:
      In the Guardian for 2 November 1989, Katie Campbell mentioned the disparaging See You Next Tuesday as a description for an unreliable young man (= cunt), and commented: 'Imagine a word so powerful that it has to be disguised, even when used as a term of abuse.'
    • 2005, Kevin Weisman, Alias Assumed: Sex, Lies and SD-6, p. 13:
      "See you next Tuesday," she said crisply, the camera holding her in close-up an extra beat for emphasis. You could almost hear the thud of knowing viewers falling off their chairs. In decades-old high-school vernacular, "See you next Tuesday" is code for the word that starts with the letters "c-u," means female genitalia and is used to insult a woman when "bitch" just isn't strong enough.
    • 2006, Nick Hemsley, Clock, p. 96:
      'See you next Tuesday.' I learnt that at my convent school (My mother was Catholic). We would say it to the nuns who didn't have a clue what it meant...
    • 2006, Jane May, Doggy Style, p. 243:
      "That diva may be gorgeous, but she's a real, well, you know, a see-you-next-Tuesday." "A what?" asked Jen. I cocked my head. Curious, myself. "She's—pardon the expression—a cunt."