Last modified on 8 October 2014, at 22:38

sequitur

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin sequitur (it follows), the third person form of sequor (I follow).

NounEdit

sequitur (plural sequiturs or sequuntur)

  1. A logical conclusion or consequence of facts.
    • 1843, Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Mystery of Marie Rogêt’:
      He is accordingly in haste to show that it was not kept on shore; for, if so, ‘some trace would be found on shore of the murderers’. I presume you smile at the sequitur.

AntonymsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

sequitur

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of sequor