Last modified on 21 July 2014, at 23:48

serene

See also: Serene

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Latin serēnus (clear, cloudless, untroubled).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

serene (comparative more serene or serener, superlative most serene or serenest)

  1. Peaceful, calm, unruffled.
    She looked at her students with joviality and a serene mentality.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 1, The Purchase Price:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
  2. Without worry or anxiety; unaffected by disturbance.
  3. (archaic) fair and unclouded (as of the sky); clear; unobscured.
    • Alexander Pope
      The moon serene in glory mounts the sky.
    • Gray
      Full many a gem of purest ray serene / The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, chapter 6, Frankenstein:
      A serene sky and verdant fields filled me with ecstasy.
  4. Used as part of certain titles.
    Her Serene Highness
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

serene (third-person singular simple present serenes, present participle serening, simple past and past participle serened)

  1. (transitive) To make serene.
    Heaven and earth, as if contending, vie / To raise his being, and serene his soul. — Thomson.

NounEdit

serene (plural serenes)

  1. (poetic) Serenity; clearness; calmness.
    • Southey
      the serene of heaven
    • Young
      To their master is denied / To share their sweet serene.
  2. Evening air; night chill.
    • Ben Jonson
      Some serene blast me.

Etymology 2Edit

Old French serein (evening), Vulgar Latin *serānum — from substantive use of sērum, neuter of sērus (late) + -ānus suffix.

NounEdit

serene (plural serenes)

  1. A fine rain from a cloudless sky after sunset.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Oxford English Dictionary. serein n. 1.

DutchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

serene

  1. Inflected form of sereen

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

serena +‎ -e

AdverbEdit

serene

  1. calmly, serenely

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

serene f

  1. Feminine plural form of sereno

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

serēne

  1. vocative masculine singular of serēnus

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

serene

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of serenar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of serenar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of serenar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of serenar.