Last modified on 16 July 2014, at 01:29

seriatum

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From seriatum, neuter of Medieval Latin or New Latin seriatus (arranged in serial order).

NounEdit

seriatum

  1. (uncommon) a series, a sequence
    • 1934, in The American Mercury (Henry Louis Mencken, George Jean Nathan, editors), volume 32, page 405:
      She named them — a seriatum not of causes but of symptoms. For a long time she made no suggestion as to any fundamental cure.
    • 1986, The Life of the transcendental ego: essays in honor of William Earle (William Earle, Edward S. Casey, Donald V. Morano), page 205:
      [] perhaps now in present perception, but also reflexively to become identical with itself through the seriatum of time.
    • 2000, A. Kiruṭṭin̲an̲, Tamil culture: religion, culture, and literature, page 294:
      Konkuvel depicts the marital proceedings of Vacavatattai and Utayanan in a seriatum: The astrologer computed the auspicious day for the wedding. The valluvan mounted on an elephant, beat the drum and announced []

Etymology 2Edit

Misspelling of seriatim, influenced by the commonness of the Latin ending -um.

AdverbEdit

seriatum

  1. Common misspelling of seriatim, sequentially.
    • 1885, in the Proceedings of the Convention on the Improvement of the Western Waterways, page 41:
      THE CHAIR-- I suppose that the motion to take up the resolutions seriatum should be considered first.
    • 1901, in the Daughters of the American Revolution magazine, volume 18, page 797:
      Has the motion been made that they be considered seriatum? If the motion has not already been made, I wish to move that these amendments be considered seriatum.
    • 1912, in the Proceedings of the Organization Meeting and of the First Annual Convention of the Investment Bankers' Association of America, page 38:
      Mr. Block: Mr. Chairman, I move, then, that the Constitution be not taken up seriatum, section by section. [] If we take it up seriatum we may stay here until next week.

AdjectiveEdit

seriatum

  1. Common misspelling of seriatim, sequential.
    • 1908, in the Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, volume 14, page 241:
      A. No, sir; because we would have to make a seriatum rating of them.
    • 1919, Stimulation of live-stock products: hearings before the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, page 107:
      The following is a seriatum review of the principal points disputed by Swift & Co. in this pamphlet.
    • 2002, Casenote Legal Briefs: Business Organizations/Corporation, page 86:
      A seriatum resignation procedure such as this would be valid if the stock involved were over 50% of voting stock, []

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

seriātum

  1. nominative neuter singular of seriātus
  2. accusative masculine singular of seriātus
  3. accusative neuter singular of seriātus
  4. vocative neuter singular of seriātus