sermon

See also: sermón

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sermō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sermon (plural sermons)

  1. Religious discourse; a written or spoken address on a religious or moral matter.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 3, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      One saint's day in mid-term a certain newly appointed suffragan-bishop came to the school chapel, and there preached on “The Inner Life.”  He at once secured attention by his informal method, and when presently the coughing of Jarvis […] interrupted the sermon, he altogether captivated his audience with a remark about cough lozenges being cheap and easily procurable.
  2. A lengthy speech of reproval.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sermon (third-person singular simple present sermons, present participle sermoning, simple past and past participle sermoned)

  1. (poetic, obsolete) To discourse to or of, as in a sermon.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  2. (poetic, obsolete) To tutor; to lecture.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sermō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sermon m (plural sermons)

  1. sermon (religious speech)
  2. sermon (lengthy reproval)

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 17:57