Last modified on 26 April 2014, at 21:56

seter

EnglishEdit

A seter in Gudbrandsdal, Norway, situated above the tree line in the mountains and used for summer pasture.

EtymologyEdit

From Norwegian seter (mountain pasture) or Swedish säter (mountain pasture).

NounEdit

seter (plural seters)

  1. A summer pasture, especially one in the mountains of Scandinavia, to which a farmer takes livestock as part of transhumance.
    • 1964, Reidar Christiansen, Folktales of Norway, page 114:
      Every summer, a long long time ago, they went up to the seter with the cows from Melbustad, in Hadeland.
    • 1968, Axel Christian Zetlitz Sømme, A geography of Norden: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, page 248:
      In Østlandet, on the contrary, the high mountain plateau, the gentle slopes and the grouping of seters in clusters permit the building of roads and therefore a modernized use of the seters.
    • 2002, Brian Roberts, Landscapes of Settlement: Prehistory to the Present, page 131:
      For example, twelfth- and thirteenth-century documents from the north of England mention place-names incorporating the term 'shield' or 'shiel', a 'shieling' being an area of summer pasture corresponding to the seters of Sweden.
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Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

seter n

  1. indefinite plural of sete