EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

AdverbEdit

sic (not comparable)

  1. thus; thus written
Usage notesEdit

The word sic may be used in brackets to show that an uncommon or archaic usage is reported faithfully: for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:

The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker ...

It may also be used to highlight a perceived error, sometimes for the purpose of ridicule, as in this example from The Times:

Warehouse has been around for 30 years and has 263 stores, suggesting a large fan base. The chain sums up its appeal thus: "styley [sic], confident, sexy, glamorous, edgy, clean and individual, with it's [sic] finger on the fashion pulse."[1]

Since it is not an abbreviation, it does not require a following period.

Related termsEdit
  • sic passim (Used to indicate that the preceding word, phrase, or term is used in the same manner (or form) throughout the remainder of a text.)
  • sic transit gloria mundi (Fame is temporary.)
  • sic semper tyrannis (Thus always to tyrants, shouted by John Wilkes Booth after assassinating Abraham Lincoln.)
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. To mark with a bracketed sic.[2]
    E. Belfort Bax wrote "... the modern reviewer's taste is not really shocked by half the things he sics or otherwise castigates."[2][3]

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of seek.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. (transitive) To incite an attack by, especially a dog or dogs.
    He sicced his dog on me!
  2. (transitive) To set upon; to chase; to attack.
    Sic 'em, Mitzi.
Usage notesEdit
  • The sense of "set upon" is most commonly used as an imperative, in a command to an animal.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ashworth, Anne, "Chain reaction: Warehouse", The Times, 2006-06-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "sic, adv. (and n.)" Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition 1989. Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ E. Belfort Bax. On Some Forms of Modern Cant. Commonweal: 7 May 1887. Marxists’ Internet Archive: 14 Jan. 2006

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

AdverbEdit

sic

  1. sic

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *so (this, that), same source as Old English sio (she).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

sīc (not comparable)

  1. thus, so, just like that
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.
  2. yet

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

sic

  1. rafsi of stici.

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sic (not comparable)

  1. such

PronounEdit

sic

  1. such

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Sitz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sȉc m (Cyrillic spelling си̏ц)

  1. (regional) seat (of a vehicle)

SynonymsEdit

  • sjȅdalo

ReferencesEdit

  • sic” in Hrvatski jezični portal
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 01:19