simmer down

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

to simmer down (phrasal verb)

  1. (intransitive, idiomatic) To decrease in intensity of anger, agitation, or excitement.
    • 1870, Mark Twain, "Goldsmith's Friend Abroad Again," letter 4:
      "Silence! Now ye had better go slow, my good fellow. This is two or three times you've tried to get off some of your d----d insolence. Lip won't do here. You've got to simmer down."
    • 1910, Stewart Edward White, The Rules of the Game, ch. 73:
      The agitation, thus deprived of its chief hope, might very well have been expected to simmer down, to die away slowly.
    • 2003, Nazila Fathi, "British Minister Presses Iran To Allow Nuclear Inspections," New York Times, 30 Jun. (retrieved 9 Apr. 2009):
      Although the street demonstrations have simmered down, protests have continued in other forms.

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Last modified on 9 October 2013, at 09:43