Last modified on 27 July 2014, at 17:02

sirup

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • syrup generally considered standard

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sirup, from Anglo-French sirop, from Medieval Latin siruppus, syrupus, from Arabic شراب (šarāb, a drink, wine, coffee, syrup). Compare French sirop, Italian siroppo, Spanish jarabe, jarope. Compare also sherbet.

The first known use of sirup was in the 14th century.

NounEdit

sirup (plural sirups)

  1. (obsolete) A thick and viscid liquid made from the juice of fruits, herbs, etc., boiled with sugar.
  2. (obsolete) A thick and viscid saccharine solution of superior quality (as sugarhouse sirup or molasses, maple sirup); specifically, in pharmacy and often in cookery, a saturated solution of sugar and water (simple sirup), or such a solution flavored or medicated.
    • Lucent sirups tinct with cinnamon. --John Keats.

Derived termsEdit

  • Mixing sirup. See the Note under Dextrose.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sirup m

  1. syrup (liquid)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sirop and Latin siropus

NounEdit

sirup m (definite singular sirupen, indefinite plural siruper, definite plural sirupene)

  1. syrup

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sirop and Latin siropus

NounEdit

sirup m (definite singular sirupen, indefinite plural sirupar, definite plural sirupane)

  1. syrup

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sǐrup/
  • Hyphenation: si‧rup

NounEdit

sìrup m (Cyrillic spelling сѝруп)

  1. syrup

DeclensionEdit