Last modified on 22 November 2014, at 19:52
See also: ský, SKY, and -ský

EnglishEdit

A blue sky

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sky, from Old Norse ský (cloud), from Proto-Germanic *skiwją, *skiwô (cloud, cloud cover, haze), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)k(')ew-, *(s)keu- (sky, cloud). Cognate with Old English scēo (cloud), Old Saxon scio, skio, skeo (light cloud cover), Old Irish cēo (sky), Irish ceo (mist, fog). Also related to Old English scūa (shadow, darkness), Latin obscūrus (dark, shadowy), Sanskrit स्कुनाति (skunāti, he covers). [Devanagari needed]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sky (plural skies)

  1. (obsolete) A cloud.
  2. The atmosphere above a given point, especially as visible from the ground during the day.
    That year, a meteor fell from the sky.
  3. The part of the sky which can be seen from a specific place or at a specific time; its condition, climate etc.
    I lay back under a warm Texas sky.
    We're not sure how long the cloudy skies will last.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, chapter 2:
      She wakened in sharp panic, bewildered by the grotesquerie of some half-remembered dream in contrast with the harshness of inclement fact, drowsily realising that since she had fallen asleep it had come on to rain smartly out of a shrouded sky.
  4. Heaven.
    This mortal has incurred the wrath of the skies.

Usage notesEdit

Usually the word can be used correctly in either the singular or plural form, but the plural is now mainly poetic.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

sky (third-person singular simple present skies, present participle skying, simple past and past participle skied or skyed)

  1. (sports) to hit, kick or throw (a ball) extremely high.
    • 2011 January 22, Ian Hughes, “Arsenal 3 - 0 Wigan”, BBC:
      Van Persie skied a penalty, conceded by Gary Caldwell who was sent off, and also hit the post before scoring his third with a shot at the near post.
  2. (colloquial, dated) To hang (a picture on exhibition) near the top of a wall, where it cannot be well seen.
    • The Century
      Brother Academicians who skied his pictures.
  3. (colloquial) to drink something from a container without one's lips touching the container

StatisticsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schūwe, schū.

AdjectiveEdit

sky (inflexible)

  1. shy
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse ský.

NounEdit

sky c (singular definite skyen, plural indefinite skyer)

  1. cloud
InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From French jus, from Latin ius (gravy, broth, sauce).

NounEdit

sky c (singular definite skyen, not used in plural form)

  1. gravy, stock (a kind of soup)
  2. jelly (made of gravy)

Etymology 4Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schūwen.

VerbEdit

sky (imperative sky, present skyr or skyer, past skyede, past participle skyet)

  1. To shun

NorwegianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sky

  1. shy

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

sky

  1. cloud

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

sky

  1. despise

ConjugationEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ský.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sky (plural skies)

  1. sky
    It's a fair braw sky we'v got the nicht. It's quite a beautiful sky we've got tonight.
  2. daylight (especially at dawn)
    A wis up afore the sky. I was up before sunrise.
  3. skyline, outline against the sky (especially of a hill)
    He saw the sky o a hill awa tae the west. He saw the outline of a hill in the west.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

tae sky (third-person singular simple present skies, present participle skies, simple past skyin, past participle skiet)

  1. (of weather) to clear up
  2. to shade the eyes with the hand (so as to see better)
  3. to hold up to the light and examine

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare English sky.

NounEdit

sky

  1. (countable) heaven
  2. (countable) sky
  3. (countable) cloud

Etymology 2Edit

Corrupted from the French jus.

NounEdit

sky

  1. (uncountable, cooking) The liquid that remains in a frying pan after the fried meat is ready.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German schǖwen.

VerbEdit

sky

  1. avoid due to fear or disgust, shun