Last modified on 26 August 2014, at 19:32

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Irish slua (crowd) (noun only)

NounEdit

slew (plural slews)

  1. (US) A large amount.
    She has a slew of papers and notebooks strewn all over her desk.
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

In all senses, a mostly British spelling of slue.

NounEdit

slew (plural slews)

  1. The act, or process of slaying.
  2. A device used for slaying.
  3. A change of position.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

slew (third-person singular simple present slews, present participle slewing, simple past and past participle slewed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To rotate or turn something about its axis.
  2. (transitive) To veer a vehicle.
  3. (transitive) To insert extra ticks or skip some ticks of a clock to slowly correct its time.
  4. (intransitive) To pivot.
  5. (intransitive) To skid.
  6. (transitive, rail transport) to move something (usually a railway line) sideways
    The single line was slewed onto the disused up formation to make way for the future redoubling
  7. (transitive, UK, slang) To make a public mockery of someone through insult or wit.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

slew

  1. simple past tense of slay

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit