Last modified on 16 July 2014, at 01:34

soother

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

sooth +‎ -er

AdjectiveEdit

soother

  1. (archaic) comparative form of sooth: more sooth, truer.

Etymology 2Edit

soothe +‎ -er

NounEdit

soother (plural soothers)

  1. One who, or that which, soothes.
  2. (Canada, Ireland) A plastic device that goes into a baby’s mouth, used to calm and quiet the baby.

SynonymsEdit

(baby device):

VerbEdit

soother (third-person singular simple present soothers, present participle soothering, simple past and past participle soothered)

  1. To soothe.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Chapter 13
      And two great big lovely big tears coursing down his cheeks. It was all no use soothering him with no, nono, baby, no and telling him about the geegee and where was the puffpuff but Ciss, always readywitted, gave him in his mouth the teat of the suckingbottle and the young heathen was quickly appeased.

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