soubrette

See also: Soubrette

EnglishEdit

Annie Lewis (c. 1869—1896) performing as a soubrette

EtymologyEdit

From French soubrette, from Occitan soubreta (coy) (feminine of soubret), from soubra (Provençal sobrar), from Latin superare (be above).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soubrette (plural soubrettes)

  1. A female servant or attendant, especially as mischievous or cheeky, often featuring in theatrical comedies
    • 1936, Henry Miller, Black Spring:
      And then too it was exhilarating to see the baron come sailing in with a pair of soubrettes on his arm – each time a different pair.
    • 1969, Film Bulletin, Volume 38, page 127:
      This version of the fragile, yet touching story accents the romance and courtship of the schoolmaster, properly called Mr. Chipping, and the music hall soubrette he falls in love with while vacationing in Pompeii.
    • 1997, Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon:
      The servants in the hall tonight are whitely-wigged black slaves in livery of a certain grade of satin and refinement of lace,– black Major-domos and black Soubrettes.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Occitan soubreto.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soubrette f (plural soubrettes)

  1. (theater) maid
  2. (archaic except humorous) maid

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

French

NounEdit

soubrette f (invariable)

  1. showgirl
Last modified on 2 March 2014, at 07:45