Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 08:50

souse

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English souse (to pickle, steep in vinegar) also a noun "liquid for pickling" and "pickled pig parts", from Old French sous (preserved in salt and vinegar), from Frankish *sultija (saltwater, brine), from Proto-Germanic *sultijō (saltwater, brine). Cognate with Old Saxon sultia (saltwater), Old High German sulza (brine).

NounEdit

souse (plural souses)

  1. Something kept or steeped in brine
    1. The pickled ears, feet, etc., of swine.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Tusser
        And he that can rear up a pig in his house, / Hath cheaper his bacon, and sweeter his souse.
      1. (US, Appalachia) Pickled scrapple.
      2. (Caribbean) Pickled or boiled ears and feet of a pig
    2. A pickle made with salt.
    3. The ear; especially, a hog's ear.
  2. The act of sousing; a plunging into water.
  3. A person suffering from the disease of alcoholism.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

souse (third-person singular simple present souses, present participle sousing, simple past and past participle soused)

  1. To immerse in liquid; to steep or drench.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Addison
      They soused me over head and ears in water.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Gascoigne
      although I be well soused in this shower
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      As she heard him sousing heartily in cold water, heard the eager scratch of the steel comb on the side of the bowl, as he wetted his hair, she closed her eyes in disgust.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Obscure origin. Compare Middle German sûs (noise).

NounEdit

souse (plural souses)

  1. The act of sousing, or swooping.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Spenser
      As a falcon fair / That once hath failed or her souse full near.
  2. A heavy blow.
    • 1596, Spencer, Fairie Queene
      His murdrous mace he vp did reare, That seemed nought the souse thereof could beare.

VerbEdit

souse (third-person singular simple present souses, present participle sousing, simple past and past participle soused)

  1. (now dialectal, transitive) to strike, beat
  2. (now dialectal, intransitive) to fall heavily
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      Him so transfixed she before her bore / Beyond his croupe, the length of all her launce; / Till, sadly soucing on the sandy shore, / He tombled on an heape, and wallowd in his gore.
    • (Can we date this quote?) J. Dryden. Jr.
      Jove's bird will souse upon the tim'rous hare.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) to pounce upon
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      [The gallant monarch] like eagle o'er his serie towers, / To souse annoyance that comes near his nest.

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowing from Old French sous (plural of sout).

NounEdit

souse

  1. (obsolete) sou (the French coin)
  2. (dated) A small amount

AnagramsEdit