sowen

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

sowen

  1. (obsolete) past participle of sow
    • 1589, George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie[1]:
      And in this resembling the learning of an euill man to the seedes sowen in barren ground.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I[2], edition 1921 ed.:
      XLII And to augment the glorie of his guile, 370 His dearest love, the faire Fidessa, loe Is there possessed of the traytour vile, Who reapes the harvest sowen by his foe, Sowen in bloudy field, and bought with woe: That brothers hand shall dearely well requight, 375 So be, O Queene, you equall favour showe.
    • 1753, Theophilus Cibber, The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland[3]:
      He that has his hand well put in this mittaine; He shall have multiplying of his graine, When he hath sowen, be it wheat or otes; So that he offer good pens or grotes!

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Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 23:34