Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 17:16

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

spak

  1. past tense of speak

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

spak

  1. simple past tense of speak
    • 1806, Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3)[1]:
      Then spak the lord, hight Hamilton, And to the nobil king said he, "My sovereign prince, sum counsell take, First at your nobilis, syne at me.
    • 1905, Robert Louis Stevenson, David Balfour, Second Part[2]:
      But whan he spak, it was mair in sorrow than in anger.
    • 1898, Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, Scottish sketches[3]:
      And I'll do this messenger justice; he laid down no law to me, he only spak o' the duty laid on his own conscience; but my conscience said 'Amen' to his--that's about it.
    • 1896, Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, Adventures in Criticism[4]:
      Ful wel she song the service divyne, Entuned in hir nose ful semely; And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly, After the scole of Stratford atte Bowe, For Frensh of Paris was to hir unknowe..."
    • 1919, Frederic Moorman, More Tales of the Ridings[5]:
      Them was t' truest words he iver spak, an' shoo would hae been muck-cheap if I'd gien a million pund for her."
    • 1857, Various, The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV.[6]:
      I went unto her mother, and I argued and I fleech'd, I spak o' love and honesty, and mair and mair beseech'd; But she was deaf to a' my grief, she wadna look on me; O poverty!
    • 1904, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Merry Men[7]:
      Het as he was, he took a kind o' cauld grue in the marrow o' his banes; but up he spak for a' that; an' says he: 'My friend, are you a stranger in this place?'

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish spaker (wise, clever).

AdjectiveEdit

spak (comparative spakare, superlative spakast)

  1. powerless, tired, obedient, tame, calm, easy, reasonable; of a person or animal that used to resist, but has given up the fight; of calm water
    spak som ett lamm
    tame as a lamb
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old Swedish spaker (rod, stick, lever), from Middle Low German spake, cognate with Danish spag (spoke), Dutch spaak (spoke), and English spoke.

NounEdit

spak c

  1. a lever, a rod, a handle, a stick, a joystick, a control
    nazisterna sitter vid spakarna
    the nazis are in control
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit