Last modified on 28 July 2014, at 09:34
See also: spår and spär

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sparre (spar, rafter, beam) (noun), sparren (to close, bar) (verb), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *sparrô (stake, beam), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)par- (beam, log). Compare Dutch spar (balk), German Sparren (rafter, spar), Danish sparre (spar), Albanian shparr, shpardh (kind of oak). Perhaps also compare spear, park.

NounEdit

spar (plural spars)

  1. A rafter of a roof.
  2. A thick pole or piece of wood.
  3. (obsolete) A bar of wood used to fasten a door.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.11:
      The Prince staid not his aunswere to devize, / But, opening streight the Sparre, forth to him came […].
  4. (nautical) A general term denoting any linear object used as a mast, sprit, yard, boom, pole or gaff.
  5. (aeronautics) A beam-like structural member that supports ribs in an aircraft wing or other airfoil.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

spar (third-person singular simple present spars, present participle sparring, simple past and past participle sparred)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) to bolt, bar.
  2. (transitive) To supply or equip (a vessel) with spars.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English sparren (to thrust or strike rapidly), from Old English sperran, spirran, spyrran (to strike, strike out at, spar), related to Low German sparre (a struggling, striving), German sich sperren (to struggle, resist, oppose), Icelandic sperrask (to kick out at, thrust, struggle).

VerbEdit

spar (third-person singular simple present spars, present participle sparring, simple past and past participle sparred)

  1. To fight, especially as practice for martial arts or hand-to-hand combat.
    • 2012 April 15, Phil McNulty, “Tottenham 1-5 Chelsea”, BBC:
      After early sparring, Spurs started to take control as the interval approached and twice came close to taking the lead. Terry blocked Rafael van der Vaart's header on the line and the same player saw his cross strike the post after Adebayor was unable to apply a touch.
  2. To strike with the feet or spurs, as cocks do.
  3. To contest in words; to wrangle.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German spar, sper (spar); or from a backformation of sparstone (spar), from Middle English sparston (gypsum, chalk), from Old English spærstān (gypsum). Related to German Sparkalk (plaster), Old English spæren (of plaster, of mortar).

NounEdit

spar (plural spars)

  1. (mineralogy) any of various microcrystalline minerals, of light, translucent, or transparent blee, which are easily cleft
  2. (mineralogy) any crystal with no readily discernible faces.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Spanish espada (sword), from Latin spatha, from Ancient Greek σπάθη (spáthē, blade).

NounEdit

spar c (singular definite sparen, plural indefinite sparer)

  1. spade (one of the black suits in a deck of cards)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See spare (to save,spare).

VerbEdit

spar

  1. Imperative of spare.

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spar m (plural sparren, diminutive sparretje n)

  1. spruce

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

spar

  1. Imperative singular of sparen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of sparen.

IcelandicEdit

AdjectiveEdit

spar (comparative sparari, superlative sparastur)

  1. economical
  2. thrifty

DeclensionEdit


KurdishEdit

NounEdit

spar ?

  1. errand

NorwegianEdit

NounEdit

spar

  1. spades (suit in playing cards)

SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

spar

  1. present tense of spara.
  2. imperative of spara.