spice

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French espice (modern épice), from Late Latin (plural) species (spices, goods, wares), from Latin (singular) spĕciēs (kind, sort).

NounEdit

spice (countable and uncountable, plural spices)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Plant matter (usually dried) used to season or flavour food.
  2. (figuratively, uncountable) Appeal, interest; an attribute that makes something appealing, interesting, or engaging.
  3. (uncountable, Yorkshire) Sweets, candy.
  4. (obsolete) Species; kind.
    • Wyclif Bible, 1 Thessalonians v. 22
      Abstain you from all evil spice.
    • Sir T. Elyot
      Justice, although it be but one entire virtue, yet is described in two kinds of spices. The one is named justice distributive, the other is called commutative.
HyponymsEdit
HypernymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spice (third-person singular simple present spices, present participle spicing, simple past and past participle spiced)

  1. (transitive) To add spice or spices to.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Formed by analogy with mice as the plural of mouse by Robert A. Heinlein in Time Enough for Love.

NounEdit

spice

  1. (nonce word) plural form of spouse

ReferencesEdit

  • spice” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

spice

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of spiciō

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

spice

  1. nominative singular neuter of spicy
  2. accusative singular neuter of spicy
  3. nominative plural of spicy
  4. accusative plural of spicy

VerbEdit

spice

  1. nominative singular neuter of spicy
  2. accusative singular neuter of spicy
  3. nominative plural of spicy
  4. accusative plural of spicy
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 02:47