Last modified on 1 June 2014, at 20:06

spight

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

spight (plural spights)

  1. Alternative form of speight.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

spight (uncountable)

  1. obsolete spelling of spite
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I[1], edition 1921 ed.:
      Her doubtfull words made that redoubted knight Suspect her truth: yet since no' untruth he knew, Her fawning love with foule disdainefull spight 475 He would not shend; but said, Deare dame I rew, That for my sake unknowne such griefe unto you grew.
    • 1706, Various, The Fifteen Comforts of Matrimony= Responses from Men[2]:
      When I found Cuckolds to Encrease apace, I Marry'd one with such an Ugly Face That one wou'd thought the Devil wou'd but grotch So foul a Figure as my Wife to touch; Yet being at a Friendly Club one Night, A Raskal came and Cuckol'd me for spight.
    • 1768, Susannah Minific Gunning, Barford Abbey[3]:
      --Nothing did I enjoy on the road;--in spight of my endeavours, tears stream'd from my eyes incessantly;--even the fine prospects that courted attention, pass'd unnotic'd.
    • 1789, Hester Lynch Piozzi, Observations and Reflections Made in the Course of a Journey through France, Italy, and Germany, Vol. I[4]:
      There was music; and the door being left at jar, as we call it, I watched the wretched servant who staid in the antichamber, and found that he was listening in spight of sorrow and starving.