Last modified on 19 December 2014, at 23:36

splendor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman splendur, splendour, or directly from its source Latin splendor, from the verb splendere (to shine).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

splendor (usually uncountable, plural splendors)

  1. Great light, luster or brilliance.
    • Rudyard Kipling The Just So Stories; How the Rhinoceros got its skin:
      "Once upon a time on an uninhabited island on the shores of the Red Sea, there lived a Parsee from whose hat the rays of the sun were reflected in more-than-oriental-splendour."
  2. Magnificent appearance, display or grandeur.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, The China Governess[1]:
      The original family who had begun to build a palace to rival Nonesuch had died out before they had put up little more than the gateway, so that the actual structure which had come down to posterity retained the secret magic of a promise rather than the overpowering splendour of a great architectural achievement.
    The splendor of the Queen's coronation was without comparison.
  3. Great fame or glory.

Usage notesEdit

Splendor is the standard spelling in American English, and splendour in modern British English

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From splendeo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

splendor m (genitive splendōris); third declension

  1. sheen, brightness, brilliance, lustre, splendour
  2. renown, fame

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative splendor splendōrēs
genitive splendōris splendōrum
dative splendōrī splendōribus
accusative splendōrem splendōrēs
ablative splendōre splendōribus
vocative splendor splendōrēs

DescendantsEdit