Last modified on 30 September 2014, at 13:33

spoor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Afrikaans, from Dutch spoor, akin to Old English and Old Norse spor (whence Danish spor), and German Spur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spoor (usually uncountable, plural spoors)

  1. The track, trail, droppings or scent of an animal
    • 1971, William S. Burroughs, The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead, page 10
      Now he has picked up the spoor of drunken vomit and there is the doll sprawled against a wall, his pants streaked with urine.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VIII
      Even poor Nobs appeared dejected as we quit the compound and set out upon the well-marked spoor of the abductor.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spoor (third-person singular simple present spoors, present participle spooring, simple past and past participle spoored)

  1. (transitive) To track an animal by following its spoor

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *spor, from Proto-Germanic *spurą.

NounEdit

spoor n (plural sporen, diminutive spoortje n)

  1. track
  2. railway track
  3. trace
  4. spoor
  5. lead, trail, clue
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

spoor f, m (plural sporen, diminutive spoortje n)

  1. spur
  2. spore
Derived termsEdit