Last modified on 23 August 2013, at 01:05

standard fare

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

standard fare (countable and uncountable, plural standard fares)

  1. (countable, literally) The usual price for travel by air, rail, or another means of transport.
    • 1893, "A Fast Train to Chicago," New York Times, 31 Mar., p. 3,
      Passengers on this nineteen-hour train will have to pay $5 more than the standard fare to Chicago, which on the Vanderbilt system is $20.
  2. (countable, by extension) A high price charged to passengers who travel without buying tickets in advance on certain public transport systems (especially British bus and tram systems) (compare penalty fare).
    • 2011, "Standard Fare", Transport for Greater Manchester
      Anyone found travelling without a valid ticket will be issued with a standard fare of £100 which must be paid within 21 days. This charge will be reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days.
  3. (uncountable, literally) Menu items or dining options which are regularly available in a restaurant or other place where food is served.
  4. (uncountable, idiomatic, by extension) Something which is normal, routine, or unexceptional; something which is commonly provided or encountered.
    • 1943, "D.S.M to Olds," Time, 26 Apr.,
      More than any other man, slim, wiry Bob Olds made Flying Fortress a household phrase before Pearl Harbor. . . . Photogenic as a Hollywood ace, he and his B-17s became standard fare in newsreels.
    • 1986, Rodney Crowell, "Album Reviews: Lyle Lovett & His Large Band ," Rolling Stone, 9 Feb. (retrieved 18 Sep. 2008),
      What makes Lovett intriguing is a grasp of emotional conflict that goes far beyond Nashville's standard fare.
    • 2008, Brain Neal, "Review: HP Compaq Presario SR5610F," PC Magazine, 29 Aug. (retrieved 18 Sep. 2008),
      The black keyboard bundled with the system is standard fare.