Last modified on 31 March 2015, at 11:09

steer

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English stēor, from Proto-Germanic *steuraz.

NounEdit

steer (plural steers)

  1. The castrated male of cattle, especially one raised for beef production.
    • 1913, Willa Cather, O Pioneers!, chapter 2
      He counted the cattle over and over. It diverted him to speculate as to how much weight each of the steers would probably put on by spring.
SynonymsEdit
HypernymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

steer (third-person singular simple present steers, present participle steering, simple past and past participle steered)

  1. (transitive) To castrate (a male calf).
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English stieran, from Proto-Germanic *stiurijaną.

NounEdit

steer (plural steers)

  1. (informal) A suggestion about a course of action.
    • 1939, Mark Hellinger, The Roaring Twenties:
      I tried to give you the steer, but I guess I didn't get it over. Everybody knew it but you.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

steer (third-person singular simple present steers, present participle steering, simple past and past participle steered)

  1. (intransitive) To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
    When planning the boat trip we had completely forgotten that we needed somebody to steer.
    • 1842, Lord Alfred Tennyson, Sir Galahad:
      I leap on board: no helmsman steers: I float till all is dark.
  2. (transitive) To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
    I find it very difficult to steer a skateboard.
    I steered my steps homeward.
  3. (intransitive) To be directed and governed; to take a direction, or course; to obey the helm.
    The boat steers easily.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 9:
      Where the wind / Veers oft, as oft [a ship] so steers, and shifts her sail.
  4. (transitive) To direct a group of animals.
  5. (transitive) To maneuver or manipulate a person or group into a place or course of action.
    Hume believes that principles of association steer the imagination of artists.
  6. (transitive) To direct a conversation.
  7. To conduct oneself; to take or pursue a course of action.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

NounEdit

steer (plural steers)

  1. (obsolete) A helmsman; a pilot.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit