stickest

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From stick (verb) + -est.

VerbEdit

stickest

  1. (archaic, with “thou) second-person singular simple present form of stick
    • ~1598, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III, Scene 1, line 1343–1344:
      [Shylock:] Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my / gold again: fourscore ducats at a sitting!
    • 1787, William Jones, "Hitopadesa of Vishnusarman" (1787, aka "Hitopadesa of Vishnu Sarman"); repr. in Works (1807), Vol. 13, p. 8:
      [...] alas! my child, by not passing the night wisely in reading, when thou art among the learned, thou stickest like a calf in the mud.

Etymology 2Edit

From stick (sticky, adj) + -est (superlative).

AdjectiveEdit

stickest

  1. (nonstandard, informal) superlative form of stick: most stick (stickiest).
    What is the stickest kind of gum?
    What is the stickest tape to hold something up with?
    What is the stickest thing on earth?

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

stickest

  1. Second-person singular subjunctive I of sticken.
Last modified on 16 March 2014, at 11:04