stoke

See also: Stoke

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English stoken, from Middle Dutch stoken (to poke, thrust) or Middle Low German stoken (to poke, thrust), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stukōną (to be stiff, push), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teug- (to push, beat). Cognate with Middle High German stoken (to pierce, jab), Norwegian Nynorsk stauka (to push, thrust). Alternative etymology derives the Middle English word from Old French estoquer, estochier (to thrust, strike), from the same Germanic source. More at stock.

VerbEdit

stoke (third-person singular simple present stokes, present participle stoking, simple past and past participle stoked)

  1. (transitive) To poke, pierce, thrust.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From a back-formation of stoker, apparently from Dutch stoker, from Dutch stoken (to kindle a fire, incite, instigate), from Middle Dutch stoken (to poke, thrust), from stock (stick, stock), see: tandenstoker. Ultimately the same word as above.

VerbEdit

stoke (third-person singular simple present stokes, present participle stoking, simple past and past participle stoked)

  1. (transitive) To feed, stir up, especially, a fire or furnace.
  2. (intransitive) To attend to or supply a furnace with fuel; to act as a stoker or fireman.
  3. To stick; to thrust; to stab.
    • Chaucer
      Nor short sword for to stoke, with point biting.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Misconstruction of stokes

NounEdit

stoke

  1. (physics) Common misspelling of stokes. (A unit of kinematic viscosity equal to that of a fluid with a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per millilitre)

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stoke

  1. singular present subjunctive of stoken
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 12:55