Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 00:56

straightforward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From straight + forward.

AdjectiveEdit

straightforward (comparative more straightforward, superlative most straightforward)

  1. Proceeding in a straight course or manner; not deviating; honest; frank.
    • 1992, George J. Church, "Why Voters Don't Trust Clinton," Time, 20 Apr, p. 38,
      A great deal of the uneasiness about Clinton reflects his propensity to dance away from straightforward yes or no answers to any character question.
  2. easy, simple, without difficulty
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Steven Gerrard goal against Poland ensures England will go to World Cup (in The Guardian, 15 October 2013)[1]
      Poland played with great energy, quick to the ball, strong in the challenge, and projecting the clear sense they had absolutely no intention whatsoever of making this a straightforward night.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

straightforward (comparative more straightforward, superlative most straightforward)

  1. In a straightforward manner.

TranslationsEdit