Last modified on 30 October 2014, at 17:39

subterrene

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subterrene (comparative more subterrene, superlative most subterrene)

  1. underground, subterranean
    • 1927, H. P. Lovecraft, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath:
      Then he saw a sort of grey phosphorescence about, and guessed they were coming even to that inner world of subterrene horror of which dim legends tell, and which is litten only by the pale death-fire wherewith reeks the ghoulish air and the primal mists of the pits at earth’s core.

NounEdit

subterrene (plural subterrenes)

  1. (rare) A machine for drilling or tunnelling underground.
    • 1956, Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, chapter 1:
      With a deafening screech of metal upon rock—which surely must echo through all the recesses of the Mountain, and waken all its nightmare brood!—the subterrene smashed through the wall and came to rest beside them.
    • 1972, American Nuclear Society, Nuclear News, volume 15, page 47:
      In the first field tests, a series of holes 2 inches in diameter and 12 feet deep were sunk with the rock-melting device, or subterrene.
    • 2009, November, Mark Ellis as James Axler, Outlanders 051: Warlord of the Pit, ISBN 0-373-63864-7:
      … “The beauty of the Subterrene is that, as it burrows through the rock hundreds of feet below the surface, it heats whatever stone it encounters into molten rock, or magma, which cools after the Subterrene has moved on. …