sumptuous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French somptueux, from Latin sumptuōsus, from sūmptus (cost, charge, expense), perfect passive participle of sūmō, sūmere (take).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sumptuous (comparative more sumptuous, superlative most sumptuous)

  1. magnificent, luxurious, extremely good
    • 1730–1774, Oliver Goldsmith, Introductory to Switzerland
      Though poor the peasant’s hut, his feasts though small,
      He sees his little lot the lot of all;
      Sees no contiguous palace rear its head
      To shame the meanness of his humble shed;
      No costly lord the sumptuous banquet deal
      To make him loathe his vegetable meal;
    • 1829, Washington Irving, The Alhambra[1]:
      I wandered on until I came to a sumptuous palace with a garden adorned with fountains and fishponds, and groves and flowers, and orchards laden with delicious fruit.
    • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, “Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, BBC Sport:
      Cabaye pulled all the strings in a dominant home performance and capped a majestic individual display with a sumptuous first-time finish into the far corner for his second goal of the afternoon.

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Last modified on 20 April 2014, at 19:12