sundor

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *sundraz, whence also Old High German suntar, Old Norse sundr

AdverbEdit

sundor

  1. apart, separate, private, aloof, by one's self
    Sundor ánra gehwilc herige ðec. — Let each one separately praise thee.

Related termsEdit

  • āsundran, āsundrian — to divide, separate, disjoin, sever; distinguish, except. asunder
  • āsyndrung f. — division
  • sundrian — to separate, sunder

Derived termsEdit

  • onsundrum — singly, separately, apart: privately: especially, in sunder
  • sundorcræft m. — special power or capacity.
  • sundorcræftiglīce — with special skill
  • sundorcȳþþu f. — special knowledge
  • sundorfeoh n. — private property
  • sundorgecynd n. — special quality
  • sundorgenga m. solitary (animal)
  • sundorgerēfland n. — land reserved to the jurisdiction of a gerēfa, reeve
  • sundorgifu f. — special gift, privilege
  • sundorhālga m. — Pharisee
  • sundorland n. — land set apart, private property
  • sundorlic — special
  • sundorlīce adv. — apart.
  • sundorlīf n. — life in seclusion
  • sundormæsse f. — separate mass, special mass
  • sundornotu f. — special office
  • sundornytt f. — special use, office, or service
  • sundorriht n. — special right, privilege
  • sundorseld n. — special seat, throne.
  • sundorsetl n. — hermitage
  • sundorsprǣc f. — private talk, private conversation, private conference
  • sundorweorþung f. — special honor, prerogative
  • sundorwīc n. — separate dwelling
  • sundorwine m. — bosom friend
  • sundorw̛īs — specially wise
  • sundorwundor n. — special wonder
  • sundoryrfe n. — private inheritance

see sunder, synder

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", sundor et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), sundor.
Last modified on 4 March 2014, at 17:52