Last modified on 22 July 2014, at 13:22

superior

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin superior (higher, being more above), from superus (being above), from super (above, over).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

superior (comparative more superior, superlative most superior)

  1. Higher in quality.
    Rebecca had always thought shorts were far superior to pants, as they didn't constantly make her legs itch.
  2. Higher in rank.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      There were many wooden chairs for the bulk of his visitors, and two wicker armchairs with red cloth cushions for superior people. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian clubs, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy decoration that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and greatly cherished.
  3. More comprehensive, as a term in classification.
    A genus is superior to a species.
  4. Located above.
    the superior jaw; the superior part of an image
    1. (botany) Above the ovary; said of parts of the flower which, although normally below the ovary, adhere to it, and so appear to originate from its upper part; also of an ovary when the other floral organs are plainly below it in position, and free from it.
    2. (botany) Belonging to the part of an axillary flower which is toward the main stem; posterior.
    3. (botany) Pointing toward the apex of the fruit; ascending; said of the radicle.
    4. (typography) Printed in superscript.
      a superior figure or letter
  5. Greater or better than average; extraordinary.
  6. Beyond the power or influence of; too great or firm to be subdued or affected by; with to.
    • Spectator
      There is not in earth a spectacle more worthy than a great man superior to his sufferings.

Usage notesEdit

  • Superior and inferior are generally followed by to; than is sometimes used mistakenly.

AntonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

superior (plural superiors)

  1. A person of higher rank or quality.
  2. The senior person in a monastic community.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

superior (comparative of superus)

  1. higher
  2. superior

InflectionEdit

Third declension, comparative variant.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative superior superius superiōrēs superiōra
genitive superiōris superiōris superiōrum superiōrum
dative superiōrī superiōrī superiōribus superiōribus
accusative superiōrem superius superiōrēs superiōra
ablative superiōre superiōre superiōribus superiōribus
vocative superior superius superiōrēs superiōra

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin superior.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /su.pɨˈɾjoɾ/
  • Hyphenation: su‧pe‧ri‧or

AdjectiveEdit

superior m, f (plural superiores; comparable)

  1. upper, higher
  2. better
  3. superior

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

superior m (plural superiores, feminine superiora, feminine plural superioras)

  1. boss
  2. head of a monastery

RomanianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

superior

  1. superior

AntonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

superior m, f (plural superiores)

  1. upper, higher
  2. better
  3. superior

NounEdit

superior m (plural superiores, feminine superiora)

  1. boss

SynonymsEdit