Last modified on 12 December 2014, at 07:56

supposititious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin suppositītius, from the participle stem of suppono.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

supposititious (comparative more supposititious, superlative most supposititious)

  1. Spurious; substituted for the genuine, counterfeit.
  2. (obsolete) Imaginary; fictitious, pretended to exist.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, p. 244:
      His good sense had pointed out to him the artifices of the monks, and the gross absurdity of their miracles, wonders, and supposititious reliques.
  3. Supposed or hypothetical.
    • 1953, Isaac Asimov, Second Foundation (1971 Panther Books Ltd publication), part II: “Search by the Foundation”, chapter 8: ‘Seldon’s Plan’, page 90, ¶¶ 7–8
      “Why this particular problem, Speaker? It obviously has significance other than purely academic.”
      “Thank you, my boy. You are as quick as I had expected. The problem is not supposititious.”

TranslationsEdit