Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 11:45

swastika

See also: Swastika

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Hindu swastika.
Nazi swastika

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit स्वस्तिक (svástika), from सु (, good, well) + अस्ति (ásti-), a verbal abstract of the root of the verb "to be", svasti thus meaning "well-being" — and the diminutive suffix (-ka); hence "little thing associated with well-being", corresponding roughly to "lucky charm". First attestation in English in 1871, a Sanskritism that replaced the Grecian term gammadion. From 1932 onwards it often referred specifically to the visually similar hooked cross (German: Hakenkreuz) emblem popularized by the Nazi party.

NounEdit

swastika (plural swastikas)

  1. A cross with arms of equal length all bent halfway along at a 90° angle to the right or to the left, used as a religious symbol by various ancient and modern civilizations, and adopted more recently (with arms angled to the right) as a symbol of Nazism and fascism.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Sending of Dana Da’, In Black and White (Folio Society 2005), page 423-4:
      This was signed by Dana Da, who added pentacles and pentagrams, and a crux ansata, and half-a-dozen swastikas, and a Triple Tau to his name, just to show that he was all he laid claim to be.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity (Penguin 2010), page 270:
      It is clear from archaeological finds that they enjoyed wearing Christian crosses, though they might enliven these with such symbols as the Indian swastika which Buddhists had brought them.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

NounEdit

swastika f, m (plural swastika's)

  1. swastika