sweer

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English swer, sware, from Old English swǣr, swār (heavy, of great weight, oppressive, grievous, painful, unpleasant, great, sad, feeling or expressing grief, grave, slow, dull, sluggish, slothful, indolent, inactive from weakness, enfeebled, weak), from Proto-Germanic *swēraz, *swērijaz (heavy), from Proto-Indo-European *swēr- (heavy). Cognate with West Frisian swier (heavy, burdensome, onerous, pregnant), Dutch zwaar (heavy, hard, difficult), German schwer (difficult, hard, heavy), Swedish svår (hard, severe, difficult, heavy), Latin sērius (earnest, serious), Lithuanian swarus (heavy), Albanian var (to hang, burden, annoy), Ancient Greek ἕρμα (herma, prop, foundation, reef, hill).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sweer (comparative more sweer, superlative most sweer)

  1. (UK dialectal) Heavy.
  2. (UK dialectal) Dull; indolent; lazy.
  3. (UK dialectal) Reluctant; unwilling; disinclined.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zweren, from Middle Dutch sweren, from Old Dutch *swerien, sweren, from Proto-Germanic *swarjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *swer-.

VerbEdit

sweer (present sweer, present participle swerende, past participle gesweer)

  1. to swear

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • sweir

EtymologyEdit

Old English swǣr. Cognate with West Frisian swier, Dutch zwaar, German schwer, Swedish svår.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sweer (comparative mair sweer, superlative maist sweer)

  1. reluctant, unwilling
  2. sad, depressed
  3. lazy
  4. depressing

Related termsEdit

QuotationsEdit

  • 2000, The flouer's bonniness minded him o cantier times but the rose itsel wis mingin wi sweir connotations. But n Ben A-Go-Go p.6
Last modified on 27 August 2013, at 12:54