synoptic

See also: Synoptic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin synopticus, from Ancient Greek συνοπτικός (sunoptikos, seeing the whole together or at a glance), from σύνοψις (sunopsis, a general view, synopsis), from σύν (sun, with) + ὄψις (opsis, view).

AdjectiveEdit

synoptic (comparative more synoptic, superlative most synoptic)

  1. Of, or relating to a synopsis
  2. In general, pertaining to or affording an overall view. In meteorology, this term has become somewhat specialized in referring to the use of meteorological data obtained simultaneously over a wide area for presenting a comprehensive and nearly instantaneous picture of the state of the atmosphere. Thus, to a meteorologist, synoptic takes the additional connotation of simultaneity.
  3. (Meteorology) synoptic *scale* refers to weather or climatological patterns on the order or 1000 kilometres, or on the order of days or weeks (e.g. high pressure cells, or storm tracks).

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Last modified on 13 March 2014, at 18:30