Last modified on 10 January 2014, at 18:34

take the piss

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from piss-proud. Figuratively, to be piss-proud is to have false pride, thus 'taking the piss out of' is to deflate their false pride, usu. through disparagement or mockery.[1] As the piss-proud metaphor became dated, 'taking the piss out of someone' came to refer to disparagement or mockery itself, regardless of the pride of the subject. Eventually the shortened, intransitive form 'taking the piss' became common.

VerbEdit

take the piss (out of)

  1. (New Zealand, UK, vulgar, slang, idiomatic, transitive) To tease, ridicule or mock (someone).
    • 1987, Judy Vermorel, Sex Pistols: the inside story‎, p.16
      You know, cos he was like taking the piss out of them and they took the piss out of him.
    • 1999, Carole Zucker, In the company of actors: reflections on the craft of acting‎, p.152
      A lot of that stuff that people take the piss out of all the time is actually useful.
  2. (New Zealand, UK, vulgar, slang, idiomatic, intransitive) To subject those present to teasing, ridicule or mockery, or to show contempt.
    • 2008, Will Swanton, Some Day: Inside the Dream Tour and Mick Fanning's 2007 Championship Win‎, [2]
      He's either taking it easy or taking the piss by arriving at the eleventh hour.

Usage notesEdit

  • As this phrase may be found offensive, it is often bowdlerised to take the pee or censored in print as “take the p***” or, less commonly, “take the p—”. A common jocular euphemism is extract the urine, a formal equivalent of the literal meaning of the words.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1999 August 14, Michael Quinion, World Wide Words: Take the piss[1], retrieved on 2011-01-07: