tamal

EnglishEdit

Two tamales.

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish tamal, from Nahuatl (wrapped).

NounEdit

tamal (plural tamales)

  1. Alternative form of tamale (Mexican food dish).
    • 1911, Coffee and Tea Industries and the Flavor Field, Vol. 34, p. 497
      I fully recognize the excellence of the tamal of the gringos. It is a superb standby for picknickers, prospectors, camping-outers, school children, and factory lunches.
    • 2000, Bruce Geddes, Mexico, p.43
      Someone from Campeche may brag about a tamal made there with a salsa of guajillo chiles, axiote (a regional spice), jitomate...
    • 2007, Robin S. Goldstein, Fearless Critic Houston Restaurant Guide: Brutally Honest Undercover Chefs and Food Writers Rate More Than 400 Places to Eat, page 314
      Ask for Salvadoran crema to accompany whichever you choose; it's thick and somewhat akin to sour cream, and you'll get that much more pleasure from your tamal.

Usage notesEdit

The form tamal is preferred by some to tamale, as tamal is the Standard Spanish singular form while tamale is generally analyzed as a back-formation from the plural tamales, thus proscribed. Note however that tamale exists in Spanish dialect.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CahuillaEdit

NounEdit

támal (plural támlem)

  1. mouth
  2. tooth

Derived termsEdit


Guugu YimidhirrEdit

NounEdit

tamal

  1. Alternative spelling of dhamal.

PipilEdit

NounEdit

tamal

  1. A tortilla.

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Classical Nahuatl tamalli (something wrapped).

NounEdit

tamal m (plural tamales)

  1. (Central America, Mexico) tamal, tamale
  2. (Central America, Mexico) bundle, clumsy package
  3. (Central America, Mexico) embroilment, imbroglio

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 10 December 2013, at 15:40