tarantella

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Italian tarantella, a diminutive of Taranto, a town in southern Italy (but popularly associated with tarantola ‘tarantula’, on the belief that the dance was variously a result of, or cure for, its bite).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tarantella (plural tarantellas)

  1. A rapid dance in 6/8 time, originating in Italy, or a piece of music for such a dance.
    • 1868Louisa May Alcott, Little Women ch. 37
      The set in which they found themselves was composed of English, and Amy was compelled to walk decorously through a cotillion, feeling all the while as if she could dance the tarantella with relish.
    • 1895Bret Harte, The Devotion of Enriquez
      "A tarantella, I presume?" blandly suggested the doctor.
      Miss Mannersley stopped, and rose carelessly from the piano. "It is a Moorish gypsy song of the fifteenth century," she said dryly.
    • 1922Walter Lippmann, Public Opinion ch. v
      We learn to understand why our addled minds seize so little with precision, why they are caught up and tossed about in a kind of tarantella by headlines and catch-words, why so often they cannot tell things apart or discern identity in apparent differences.

Related termsEdit

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FinnishEdit

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fi

NounEdit

tarantella

  1. tarantula

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Diminutive of Taranto, a town in southern Italy (but popularly associated with tarantola ‘tarantula’).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tarantella f (plural tarantelle)

  1. tarantella

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 02:37