Last modified on 22 June 2014, at 13:59

tassel

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Ornamental tassels

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tassel.

NounEdit

tassel (plural tassels)

  1. A ball-shaped bunch of plaited or otherwise entangled threads from which at one end protrudes a cord on which the tassel is hung, and which may have loose, dangling threads at the other end. Tassels are normally decorative elements, and as such one often finds them attached, usually along the bottom hem, to garments, curtains or other hangings.
  2. The male inflorescence of maize, which consists of loose threads with anthers on them.
  3. The loose hairs at the end of a braid.
  4. A narrow silk ribbon, or similar, sewed to a book to be put between the pages.
  5. (architecture) A piece of board that is laid upon a wall as a sort of plate, to give a level surface to the ends of floor timbers.
  6. A kind of bur used in dressing cloth; a teasel.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

tassel (third-person singular simple present tassels, present participle tasselling, simple past and past participle tasselled)

  1. To adorn with tassels.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act V, Scene V, verses 37-39
      […] gauzes of silver mist;
      Loop’d up with cords of twisted wreathed light,
      And tassell’d round with weeping meteors!
  2. To put forth a tassel or flower.
    Maize is a crop that tassels.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

tassel m (oblique plural tassiaus, nominative singular tassiaus, nominative plural tassel)

  1. tassel (adornment for a garment)