Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 14:15

tchotchke

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in American English in 1964, from Yiddish טשאַטשקע (tshatshke, trinket), from obsolete Polish czaczko; compare Russian цацка (cácka)[1].

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

tchotchke (plural tchotchkes)

  1. A small, decorative item or souvenir, usually of no particular value.[1]
    • 1998 Apr, Mark Rakatansky, A/Partments, in Assemblage 35, page 58, [1]
      I am a child of modernism – [...] As such I have inherited a distrust of the tchotchke, which I have still – [...]
    • 1999 Aug 8, Jesse McKinley, The Avant-Garde: Follow That Backpack, in The New York Times, page 5.16
      With limited cash and a thirst for uncommon sights, backpackers have pushed into challenging territory well before the big-money resorts or tchotchke merchants.
    • 2006, Jack Sullivan, Hitchcock's Music, Yale University Press, page 244
      Once again Hitchcock overturned the convention that music must remain subliminally in the background of a film: [...] in its quiet moments, it roams grimly wherever it pleases, investing the most banal images—a toy, [...] a tchotchke of folding hands—with dread.
  2. (obsolete) A bimbo.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 tchotchke” in the Online Etymology Dictionary (November 2001) of Douglas Harper