terrene

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Anglo-Norman, from Latin terrēnus, from terra (earth).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

terrene (comparative more terrene, superlative most terrene)

  1. Pertaining to the earth; earthly, terrestrial, worldly as opposed to heavenly.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Sir Walter Raleigh:
      God set before him a mortal and immortal life, a nature celestial and terrene.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Hickok:
      Common conceptions of the matters which lie at the basis of our terrene experience.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      Arius, warring his life long upon the consubstantiality of the Son with the Father, and Valentine, spurning Christ’s terrene body, and the subtle African heresiarch Sabellius who held that the Father was Himself His own Son.
    • 1974, Guy Davenport, Tatlin!:
      For the earth was both celestial and terrene, the down here and the up there.
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

terrene

  1. (poetic) The Earth's surface; the earth; the ground.
    • Tenfold the length of this terrene. — Milton.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

terrene (plural terrenes)

  1. Dated form of tureen.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Walpole to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

terrene f pl

  1. feminine plural of terreno

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

terrēne

  1. vocative masculine singular of terrēnus
Last modified on 30 August 2013, at 01:06