thack

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English thakken (to stroke), from Old English þaccian (to touch gently, stroke, tap), from Proto-Germanic *þakwōną (to touch lightly), from Proto-Indo-European *tag-, *taǵ- (to touch). Cognate with Old Dutch þakolōn (to stroke), Old Norse þykkr (a thwack, thump, blow), Icelandic þjökka, þjaka (to thwack, thump, beat), Norwegian tjåka (to strike, beat), Latin tangō (touch). More at thwack, tangent.

VerbEdit

thack (third-person singular simple present thacks, present participle thacking, simple past and past participle thacked)

  1. (transitive) To strike; thump; thwack.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thacce, from thakken (to stroke). See above.

NounEdit

thack (plural thacks)

  1. A stroke; a thwack.

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English þæc, from Proto-Germanic *þaką, from Proto-Indo-European *teg-. Cognate with Dutch dak, Low German Dack, Danish tag (roof), German Dach (roof), Old Norse þak (thatch, roof). Akin to Latin toga (garment) and Ancient Greek στέγος (stegos, roof)[1]. See also thatch.

NounEdit

thack (plural thacks)

  1. the weatherproof outer layer of a roof, often thatch specifically
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 223.
      This outer layer was generically known as 'thack', but, owing to the fact that the vast majority of buildings in early times were covered with a thacking of straw or some similar material, 'thatch' gradually acquired its modern restricted significance of straw, or reed, heling.

VerbEdit

thack (third-person singular simple present thacks, present participle thacking, simple past and past participle thacked)

  1. To cover a roof with thack.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tag” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog
Last modified on 27 November 2013, at 15:19